Tuesday, October 30, 2007

I'm back, bitches.

Back from a weekend in the mountains*, brushing up on union stuff, singing karaoke for the second time in my life, and eating applesauce on pork for the first time in my life. It was fun (and tasty), and the free booze was a nice touch; you ever wonder where your union dues go? Straight into my liver.

But seriously, we learned some useful information on how to better serve our fellow union members — and no, mother, I don't mean "how to better serve them kickass Cosmopolitans."

* Alright, it was the hills of the Oak Ridges Moraine, south of Barrie.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Life is about change. If it isn't, then you're not doing anything.

We should always be looking to better ourselves: physically, professionally, interpersonally, emotionally, the list goes on. If you're not, that means you want things to stay exactly the same... and if that's the case, it must mean (a.) your life is perfect, and (b.) nothing around you ever changes, either, as change naturally generates other changes.

As a consequence, your life, and the circumstances surrounding it, should eternally be in a constant state of flux. It's nice to have things you can count on — a steady paycheque is always a comforting thought, as is the eternal hotness of Halle Berry — but in the end, shit's gonna evolve. It's up to people to (c.) recognize this fact, (d.) embrace it as part of their core philosophies, and (e.) learn how to best manage this change. If you manage things right, you can actually have it working in your favour — new challenges, ideas and perspectives should always give you something to work on, and something towards which to strive.

I heard an interesting guy on the CBC this morning: he's a history teacher in Etobicoke who's being presented with a Governor General's Award for Teaching later this week. They had a snippet of dialogue in his class, and he asks his Grade 11 class this question: "What is 'success?' How will you know when you have 'succeeded?'" I've been thinking about that, off and on, for a good deal of today. What I've figured out is that, in order to be successful, you have to (f.) be happy, and (g.) feel as though you've made a difference in your own life or the lives of others.

Bigger than this, though, is the idea that success is very much a dynamic, rather than static, phenomenon. Sure, you may achieve something important today, but how will you view that tomorrow? Next week? Thirty years from now? You have to spend the rest of your life incorporating that success, and the lessons learned in achieving it, into how you see the world.

Success is merely the beginning.

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